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MAURICE UTRILLO (French) (1883 1955)

 

HAND COLOURED POCHOIRS AFTER GOUACHES BY MAURICE UTRILLO

 

A COLLECTION OF 10 POCHOIR PRINTS AFTER GOUACHES BY MAURICE UTRILLO

PRODUCED IN PARIS IN 1950 AT THE ATELIER JACOMET

CREATED FOR THE PORTFOLIO LE VILLAGE INSPIRE

DEPICTING SCENES IN THE MONTMARTRE DISTRICT OF PARIS

 

Image sizes all approximately 31cm x 25cm

 

PRICED AT 580 EACH FRAMED IN HAND FINISHED FRENCH STYLE FRAMES

 

DANIEL JACOMET & THE POCHOIR PROCESS

 

The modern French tradition in the art of print making is represented in the prestigious work of Daniel Jacomet who worked to produce beautiful Pochoir prints in collaboration with modern Masters such as Picasso, Braque, Foujita, Klee, Matisse, Renoir, Gris, Utrillo and numerous others. Jacomet was born in 1894 and was apprenticed in Paris at the age of 14 to the printer and publisher Andre Marty, taking over the business on Martys death in 1921 and founding the Atelier Jacomet. The Pochoir is a technique making use of templates. It was popular at the beginning of the 20th Century, for instance in Art Deco. To arrive at subtle shades of colour, an ingenious but time consuming and very complicated method was later invented by Jacomet which produced stunning results. Pochoir begins with the analysis of the composition, including colour tones and densities, of a colour image. Numerous stencils were designed as a means of reproducing an image. The Craftsman, known as a Decoupeur, would cut stencils with a straight edged knife. The stencils were originally made of aluminium, copper, or zinc but eventually the material of choice was either celluloid or plastic. Along with this transition of stencil materials, there was a shift away from the use of watercolour towards the broad, soft, opaque layers of gouache. The technique was further refined in an effort to create the most vivid, accurately coloured reproductions. Stencils created by the Decoupeur would be passed on to the colourists. The colourists applied the pigments using a variety of different brushes and methods of paint application to create the finished Pochoir print.Pochoir has been used in conjunction with other medium such as engraving, lithography or photography as a means of adding colour to a print.

 

 

LEglise Saint-Pierre IMAGE - SOLD

 

Le Lapin IMAGE - SOLD

 

La Rue Saint-Rustique IMAGE - SOLD

 

Le Vieux College IMAGE - SOLD

 

Le Motif a Montmartre IMAGE - SOLD

 

Rue Vieille Rue Saint-Vincent IMAGE

 

La Blanchisserie de La Bastille IMAGE- SOLD

Le Petit Rue de Montmartre IMAGE

 

Le Chateau de Saint-Bernard IMAGE

 

Un Coin du Village IMAGE

 

 

Maurice Utrillo was born in Paris in 1883. His mother, Marie-Clementine Valadon, was an artists model and it is thought that his father was an artist named Boissy. His mother later became the protg of Toulouse-Lautrec and it was he that introduced her to Degas who taught her to paint. When Maurice Valadon was still a child, Miguel Utrillo, a friend of his mother, legally recognized him as his son. Maurice did not do well at school or in his career as a bank clerk. By the time he was eighteen he had become an alcoholic and spent some time in an asylum. He was given occupational therapy and his doctor recommended to his mother that Maurice should take up painting as an emotional outlet. This proved to be very successful and Maurice Utrillo went on to produce many thousands of paintings in various mediums. By 1920 he was internationally known and in 1929 he was awarded the Cross of the Legion of Honor by the French Republic. The dealer Libaude organised his first one-man exhibition at the Galerie Blot in Paris in 1913 but it was unsuccessful. However, recognition followed an exhibition (with Suzanne Valadon) at the Galerie Bernheim-Jeune in 1923. In 1935 he married Lucie Pauwels (Valore) and moved with her in 1937 to Le Vsinet on the outskirts of Paris. In his last years, watched over by his wife, he divided his time between painting and religious devotions. Utrillo is regarded by many critics and artists as the 20th centurys greatest painter of urban scenes. He was fascinated by the streets of Montmartre particularly as it existed before the First World War. But he also painted some of the great cathedrals and views of Corsica and Brittany. But he is best remembered for his paintings of Paris and his work is appreciated by those with sophisticated as well as simple tastes. He died at Dax in the Pyrenees in 1955

 

Work by Maurice Utrillo is in the following Museums and Art Galleries: Art Institute of Chicago; Dallas Museum of Art, Texas; the Detroit Institute of Arts, Michigan;
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco;
   Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City;  Muse d'Orsay, Paris; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museum of Modern Art, New York City; National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh; National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.; Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena, California; Tate Gallery, London; The Royal Collection, London; Amgueddfa Cymru - National Museum of Wales, Cardiff; Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, British Columbia; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Arthur Ross Gallery at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Ashmolean Museum at the University of Oxford; Brooklyn Museum, New York City; Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio; Courtauld Institute of Art, London; Dublin City Gallery, The Hugh Lane, Dublin, Ireland; E.G. Bhrle Collection, Zurich; Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art at the University of Oklahoma; Harvard University Art Museums, Massachusetts; Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indiana; Jewish Museum in Prague, Czech Republic; Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska; Kunsthalle Mannheim, Germany; Lille Metropole Musee d'Art Moderne, France;   Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Magyar Nemzeti Galria (Hungarian National Gallery), Budapest; Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minnesota; Muse de l'Orangerie, Paris; Muse des Augustins, Toulouse, France; Museu de Arte de So Paulo, Brazil; Museum of Modern Art, New York City - Provenance Research Project; National Gallery of Victoria, Australia; North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Princeton University Art Museum, New Jersey; Saint Louis Art Museum, Missouri; San Diego Museum of Art, California; Smart Museum of Art at the University of Chicago; U.S. Library of Congress, Washington D.C.; University of Iowa Museum of Art, Iowa City; Winnipeg Art Gallery, Manitoba.

 

 

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